Sep 25, 2013

September/October 2013

Sometimes, change is good. Not always, of course. Classic snafus like the Ford Edsel or New Coke are old standbys in arguments that denigrate change and reinvention. And while it is true that you shouldn’t always fix what isn’t broken, a little touchup…
At a recent hearing on a proposed county-wide storm water pollution control funding measure, I witnessed a parade of private citizens, city officials and taxpayer organization representatives echoing each other’s talking points for what seemed like hours…
In our efforts to manage the impact of development on our urban waterways, we typically focus on impermeable surfaces such as roofs and pavement that prevent precipitation from soaking into the ground or being intercepted and evaporated by plants.…
Construction on the new Gov. George Deukmejian Courthouse in downtown Long Beach, Calif., is nearing completion. The former Long Beach court building was one of the courthouses in California with the greatest need for replacement; built in 1959, it…
Putting a liquid bypass in place typically is a straightforward process. But when a wastewater treatment facility located in the Northeast wanted to start constructing a new pump station, it faced a situation that was anything but typical.  The facility…
Urban sprawl, which results in the proliferation of impervious surfaces over the land, is most commonly associated with increased storm water runoff. Not only does it result in more downstream flooding, but the higher volume and velocity flows gather…
Lisbon, Portugal’s sewerage network, which is managed by Saneamento Integrado dos Municípios do Tejo e Trancão (SimTejo), comprises separate sanitary sewers and combined wastewater systems as well as partially separate systems. Lisbon experiences short,…
The area located over the western edge of the Fort Worth Botanical Garden property, in Fort Worth, Texas, once was a visible 20-ft-high wall stacked with 55-gal waste drums. Each drum contained material byproducts from the Trinity Valley Iron and Steel…
Your average Tucsonan has a clear understanding that water is a scarce commodity in Arizona, one that needs to be used wisely and sparingly. Tucson receives approximately 12 in. of rain per year, much of it in flashy, very local, monsoon downpours, with…
When most people think of storm water management, they envision large precipitation events and a need to control heavy amounts of runoff. However, there is another side to the coin that is just as critical: gathering and protecting rainwater in areas…
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