Aug 26, 2021

Charlotte, North Carolina, Observes no Blue-Green Algae in Lake Wylie

Cyanobacterial blooms were first observed on Aug. 6, 2021 by staff with Charlotte-Mecklenburg Storm Water Services while conducting a field investigation.

algal blooms

After a recent assessment of Boyd’s Cove on Lake Wylie conducted on Aug. 24, 2021, Charlotte-Mecklenburg Storm Water Services did not observe any active Blue-Green Algae (cyanobacteria) blooms.

According to the city of Charlotte, North Carolina's website, cyanobacterial blooms were first observed on Aug. 6, 2021 by staff with Charlotte-Mecklenburg Storm Water Services while conducting a field investigation. This investigation was prompted by a call from a resident who observed discolored water in the cove, and subsequent investigations are being conducted weekly by Charlotte-Mecklenburg Storm Water Services.

These assessments will determine the cyanobacteria bloom status in the cove until it is confirmed that active blooms are no longer a threat, according to the city.  

Although active cyanobacteria blooms were not observed in Boyd’s Cove during the latest assessment, the current conditions are ideal for another bloom to occur. Staff will continue to designate all of Boyd’s Cove as impacted due to these conditions, reported the city.

According to the the Mecklenburg County Health Department recommendations, citizens should:

  • Keep children and pets away from water that appears bright green, blue, discolored or scummy. Do not handle or touch large mats of algae;
  • Avoid handling, cooking or eating dead fish that may be present. Avoid fishing in the area of the bloom;
  • If you come into contact with an algal bloom, wash thoroughly;
  • Use clean water to rinse off pets that may have come into contact with an algal bloom;
  • If you or your child appears ill after being in waters containing an algal bloom, seek medical care immediately. Symptoms include loss of appetite, vomiting, diarrhea, cough, difficulty breathing, sore throat, itchy skin or rash;
  • If your pet appears to stumble, stagger or collapse after being in a pond, lake or river, seek veterinary care immediately;
  • Avoid boating in the area of the bloom.

Staff with Charlotte-Mecklenburg Storm Water Services will continue to survey the area to identify the locations of additional cyanobacterial blooms, according to the city. 

To report a possible cyanobacterial bloom, Charlotte-Mecklenburg Storm Water Services can be contacted at 311.

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