Jun 22, 2021

Pacoima, California, Officials Celebrate Opening of Glenoaks-Filmore Stormwater Capture Project

The project will capture storm water and urban runoff from a 115-acre watershed.

storm-water-california

City officials celebrated the opening of the Glenoaks-Filmore Stormwater Capture Project in Pacoima, Los Angeles, California. 

The project will capture storm water and urban runoff from a 115-acre watershed, reported The Daily News.

“The Glenoaks-Filmore Stormwater Capture Project will reduce localized flooding in an area that is disproportionately impacted by environmental concerns,” said Councilwoman Monica Rodriguez, reported The Daily News. “This $3.24 million project is a sustainable solution to managing storm water and increasing groundwater recharge in the San Fernando Groundwater Basin while bringing much needed green infrastructure to Pacoima.”

The storm water capture project is bordered by Filmore Avenue to the south, Glenoaks Boulevard to the west, Paxton Street to the north and Dronfield Avenue to the east. The project aims to improve the quality of local water and limit the amount of urban runoff that goes into the L.A. River.

According to the Los Angeles Department of Sanitation and Environment, the project will reduce flooding and increase groundwater recharge in the San Fernando Groundwater Basin, reported The Daily News. The project constructed six vegetated parkway bioswales in the public right-of-way and four dry well systems to capture storm water runoff and infiltrate it into underground aquifers. Storm water conveyance improvements were constructed and 14 new trees were planted to improve the shade canopy of the street.

The project was funded by the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power and the California Coastal Conservancy, according to The Daily News. It was completed in May 2021 after four months of design and construction.

Another project opened as well, the Argo Drain Sub-Basin Facility Project near LAX. This project will capture storm water runoff, treat and deliver it to an 8.1 million-gallon underground infiltration system.

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